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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:殷潇潇 大小:trmfZlBK31991KB 下载:BT2pOmIP12847次
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日期:2020-08-05 18:39:15
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
2.  Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.
3.  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
4.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"
5.  "There I tried to land, but could not, for it was a bad place andthe waves dashed me against the rocks, so I again took to the seaand swam on till I came to a river that seemed the most likely landingplace, for there were no rocks and it was sheltered from the wind.Here, then, I got out of the water and gathered my senses togetheragain. Night was coming on, so I left the river, and went into athicket, where I covered myself all over with leaves, and presentlyheaven sent me off into a very deep sleep. Sick and sorry as I was Islept among the leaves all night, and through the next day tillafternoon, when I woke as the sun was westering, and saw yourdaughter's maid servants playing upon the beach, and your daughteramong them looking like a goddess. I besought her aid, and sheproved to be of an excellent disposition, much more so than could beexpected from so young a person- for young people are apt to bethoughtless. She gave me plenty of bread and wine, and when she hadhad me washed in the river she also gave me the clothes in which yousee me. Now, therefore, though it has pained me to do so, I havetold you the whole truth."
6.  He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.

计划指导

1.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
2.  "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."
3.  Then Penelope's heart sank within her, and for a long time she wasspeechless; her eyes filled with tears, and she could find noutterance. At last, however, she said, "Why did my son leave me?What business had he to go sailing off in ships that make long voyagesover the ocean like sea-horses? Does he want to die without leavingany one behind him to keep up his name?"
4.  "On this we all went inland, and Eurylochus was not left behindafter all, but came on too, for he was frightened by the severereprimand that I had given him.
5.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus, you ought not to be so immeasurablyastonished at my being really here. There is no other Ulysses who willcome hereafter. Such as I am, it is I, who after long wandering andmuch hardship have got home in the twentieth year to my own country.What you wonder at is the work of the redoubtable goddess Minerva, whodoes with me whatever she will, for she can do what she pleases. Atone moment she makes me like a beggar, and the next I am a young manwith good clothes on my back; it is an easy matter for the gods wholive in heaven to make any man look either rich or poor."
6.  "By this time my deep sleep had left me, and I turned back to theship and to the sea shore. As I drew near I began to smell hot roastmeat, so I groaned out a prayer to the immortal gods. 'Father Jove,' Iexclaimed, 'and all you other gods who live in everlasting bliss,you have done me a cruel mischief by the sleep into which you havesent me; see what fine work these men of mine have been making in myabsence.'

推荐功能

1.  WHEN the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suitedhis hands, for he wanted to go into the city. "Old friend," said he tothe swineherd, "I will now go to the town and show myself to mymother, for she will never leave off grieving till she has seen me. Asfor this unfortunate stranger, take him to the town and let him begthere of any one who will give him a drink and a piece of bread. Ihave trouble enough of my own, and cannot be burdened with otherpeople. If this makes him angry so much the worse for him, but Ilike to say what I mean."
2.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."
3.  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.
4.  Telemachus answered, "I can expect nothing of the kind; it wouldbe far too much to hope for. I dare not let myself think of it. Eventhough the gods themselves willed it no such good fortune could befallme."
5.   With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.
6.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."

应用

1.  But Telemachus said, "Hush, do not answer him; Antinous has thebitterest tongue of all the suitors, and he makes the others worse."
2.  Thus did he speak. Every one approved his saying, and agreed that heshould have his escort inasmuch as he had spoken reasonably. Then whenthey had made their drink-offerings, and had drunk each as much ashe was minded they went home to bed every man in his own abode,leaving Ulysses in the cloister with Arete and Alcinous while theservants were taking the things away after supper. Arete was the firstto speak, for she recognized the shirt, cloak, and good clothes thatUlysses was wearing, as the work of herself and of her maids; so shesaid, "Stranger, before we go any further, there is a question Ishould like to ask you. Who, and whence are you, and who gave youthose clothes? Did you not say you had come here from beyond the sea?"
3.  "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.
4、  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
5、  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."

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  • 阿赫莱特纳 08-04

      Then he threw his dirty old wallet, all tattered and torn, overhis shoulder with the cord by which it hung, and went back to sit downupon the threshold; but the suitors went within the cloisters,laughing and saluting him, "May Jove, and all the other gods," saidthey, 'grant you whatever you want for having put an end to theimportunity of this insatiable tramp. We will take him over to themainland presently, to king Echetus, who kills every one that comesnear him."

  • 金书波 08-04

      Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."

  • 华惠 08-04

       "We will be sure, sir," answered Telemachus, "to tell him everythingas soon as we see him. I wish I were as certain of finding Ulyssesreturned when I get back to Ithaca, that I might tell him of thevery great kindness you have shown me and of the many beautifulpresents I am taking with me."

  • 陈立民 08-04

      Then Alcinous said, "Stranger, it was very wrong of my daughternot to bring you on at once to my house along with the maids, seeingthat she was the first person whose aid you asked."

  • 克瑞斯 08-03

    {  When she had said this Minerva went away to Olympus, which theysay is the everlasting home of the gods. Here no wind beats roughly,and neither rain nor snow can fall; but it abides in everlastingsunshine and in a great peacefulness of light, wherein the blessedgods are illumined for ever and ever. This was the place to whichthe goddess went when she had given instructions to the girl.

  • 官森泰 08-02

      When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.}

  • 李彩梅 08-02

      EURYCLEA now went upstairs laughing to tell her mistress that herdear husband had come home. Her aged knees became young again andher feet were nimble for joy as she went up to her mistress and bentover her head to speak to her. "Wake up Penelope, my dear child,"she exclaimed, "and see with your own eyes something that you havebeen wanting this long time past. Ulysses has at last indeed come homeagain, and has killed the suitors who were giving so much trouble inhis house, eating up his estate and ill-treating his son."

  • 柯文哲 08-02

      With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:

  • 张静雅 08-01

       "As spoke he drove the ram outside, but when we were a little wayout from the cave and yards, I first got from under the ram's belly,and then freed my comrades; as for the sheep, which were very fat,by constantly heading them in the right direction we managed todrive them down to the ship. The crew rejoiced greatly at seeing thoseof us who had escaped death, but wept for the others whom theCyclops had killed. However, I made signs to them by nodding andfrowning that they were to hush their crying, and told them to get allthe sheep on board at once and put out to sea; so they went aboard,took their places, and smote the grey sea with their oars. Then,when I had got as far out as my voice would reach, I began to jeerat the Cyclops.

  • 黄金周 07-30

    {  BOOK II.

  • 陈凤英 07-30

      Then the swineherd and the stockman left the cloisters together, andUlysses followed them. When they had got outside the gates and theouter yard, Ulysses said to them quietly:

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