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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吕瑞 大小:WVClwuSq81556KB 下载:9QoPNGAS19370次
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日期:2020-08-04 20:12:59
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阙国豪

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Alcinous," said he, "it is not creditable to you that a strangershould be seen sitting among the ashes of your hearth; every one iswaiting to hear what you are about to say; tell him, then, to rise andtake a seat on a stool inlaid with silver, and bid your servants mixsome wine and water that we may make a drink-offering to Jove the lordof thunder, who takes all well-disposed suppliants under hisprotection; and let the housekeeper give him some supper, ofwhatever there may be in the house."
2.  "On this he groaned, and cried out, 'Alas, alas, then the oldprophecy about me is coming true. There was a prophet here, at onetime, a man both brave and of great stature, Telemus son of Eurymus,who was an excellent seer, and did all the prophesying for theCyclopes till he grew old; he told me that all this would happen to mesome day, and said I should lose my sight by the hand of Ulysses. Ihave been all along expecting some one of imposing presence andsuperhuman strength, whereas he turns out to be a little insignificantweakling, who has managed to blind my eye by taking advantage of me inmy drink; come here, then, Ulysses, that I may make you presents toshow my hospitality, and urge Neptune to help you forward on yourjourney- for Neptune and I are father and son. He, if he so will,shall heal me, which no one else neither god nor man can do.'
3.  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'
4.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
5.  Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took hissandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minervawatched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the formof a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of theentry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not seeher, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not letthemselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the otherside of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses withher eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside themain wall of the yards. Then she said to him:
6.  Ulysses answered, "Then you must have been a very little fellow,Eumaeus, when you were taken so far away from your home and parents.Tell me, and tell me true, was the city in which your father andmother lived sacked and pillaged, or did some enemies carry you offwhen you were alone tending sheep or cattle, ship you off here, andsell you for whatever your master gave them?"

计划指导

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."
2.  On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan,with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watchover the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and couldnever grow old. Seats were ranged all along the wall, here and therefrom one end to the other, with coverings of fine woven work which thewomen of the house had made. Here the chief persons of the Phaeciansused to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons;and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches intheir hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to thosewho were at table. There are fifty maid servants in the house, some ofwhom are always grinding rich yellow grain at the mill, while otherswork at the loom, or sit and spin, and their shuttles go, backwardsand forwards like the fluttering of aspen leaves, while the linen isso closely woven that it will turn oil. As the Phaecians are thebest sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving,for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they arevery intelligent.
3.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
4.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
5.  Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."
6.  Ulysses made no answer, but bowed his head and brooded. Then a thirdman, Philoetius, joined them, who was bringing in a barren heiferand some goats. These were brought over by the boatmen who are thereto take people over when any one comes to them. So Philoetius made hisheifer and his goats secure under the gatehouse, and then went up tothe swineherd. "Who, Swineherd," said he, "is this stranger that islately come here? Is he one of your men? What is his family? Wheredoes he come from? Poor fellow, he looks as if he had been somegreat man, but the gods give sorrow to whom they will- even to kingsif it so pleases them

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1.  As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
2.  On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."
3.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
4.  "Then I saw Minos son of Jove with his golden sceptre in his handsitting in judgement on the dead, and the ghosts were gathered sittingand standing round him in the spacious house of Hades, to learn hissentences upon them.
5.   "Old man," answered Ulysses, "she knows already, so you need nottrouble about that." On this he took his seat, and the sons ofDolius gathered round Ulysses to give him greeting and embrace him oneafter the other; then they took their seats in due order near Doliustheir father.
6.  And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.

应用

1.  "I am not surprised, my dear mother, at your displeasure," repliedTelemachus, "I understand all about it and know when things are not asthey should be, which I could not do when I was younger; I cannot,however, behave with perfect propriety at all times. First one andthen another of these wicked people here keeps driving me out of mymind, and I have no one to stand by me. After all, however, this fightbetween Irus and the stranger did not turn out as the suitors meant itto do, for the stranger got the best of it. I wish Father Jove,Minerva, and Apollo would break the neck of every one of thesewooers of yours, some inside the house and some out; and I wish theymight all be as limp as Irus is over yonder in the gate of the outercourt. See how he nods his head like a drunken man; he has had sucha thrashing that he cannot stand on his feet nor get back to his home,wherever that may be, for has no strength left in him."
2.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"
3.  "When I had said this she went straight through the court with herwand in her hand and opened the pigsty doors. My men came out likeso many prime hogs and stood looking at her, but she went aboutamong them and anointed each with a second drug, whereon thebristles that the bad drug had given them fell off, and they becamemen again, younger than they were before, and much taller and betterlooking. They knew me at once, seized me each of them by the hand, andwept for joy till the whole house was filled with the sound of theirhullabalooing, and Circe herself was so sorry for them that she cameup to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, go back at onceto the sea where you have left your ship, and first draw it on tothe land. Then, hide all your ship's gear and property in some cave,and come back here with your men.'
4、  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
5、  "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

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  • 林阳阳 08-03

      As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.

  • 杨志今 08-03

      Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

  • 李明吉 08-03

       "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'

  • 李文模 08-03

      Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:

  • 李正吉 08-02

    {  The other suitors were much displeased at this, and one of the youngmen said, "Antinous, you did ill in striking that poor wretch of atramp: it will be worse for you if he should turn out to be somegod- and we know the gods go about disguised in all sorts of ways aspeople from foreign countries, and travel about the world to see whodo amiss and who righteously."

  • 穆塔 08-01

      She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.}

  • 巴伊亚 08-01

      Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."

  • 祝云辉 08-01

      "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

  • 李傲 07-31

       "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 杨任刚 07-29

    {  Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:

  • 陈薪宇 07-29

      They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."

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