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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:麻生太郎 大小:77M93Wwx35015KB 下载:2S8FkCE311613次
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日期:2020-08-03 17:57:33
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."
2.  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
3.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
4.  A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.
5.  "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."
6.  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."

计划指导

1.  When he had thus spoken, he said to his son Mercury, "Mercury, youare our messenger, go therefore and tell Calypso we have decreedthat poor Ulysses is to return home. He is to be convoyed neither bygods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a rafthe is to reach fertile Scheria, the land of the Phaeacians, who arenear of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were oneof ourselves. They will send him in a ship to his own country, andwill give him more bronze and gold and raiment than he would havebrought back from Troy, if he had had had all his prize money andhad got home without disaster. This is how we have settled that heshall return to his country and his friends."
2.  "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.
3.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."
4.  "See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after allnothing but their own folly. Look at Aegisthus; he must needs makelove to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, thoughhe knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn himnot to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure totake his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home. Mercurytold him this in all good will but he would not listen, and now he haspaid for everything in full."
5.  Ulysses answered, "May King Jove grant all happiness toTelemachus, and fulfil the desire of his heart."
6.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."

推荐功能

1.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."
2.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."
3.  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
4.  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.
5.   "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'
6.  "Then I tried to find some way of embracing my mother's ghost.Thrice I sprang towards her and tried to clasp her in my arms, buteach time she flitted from my embrace as it were a dream or phantom,and being touched to the quick I said to her, 'Mother, why do younot stay still when I would embrace you? If we could throw our armsaround one another we might find sad comfort in the sharing of oursorrows even in the house of Hades; does Proserpine want to lay astill further load of grief upon me by mocking me with a phantomonly?'

应用

1.  Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.
2.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
3.  "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'
4、  Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.
5、  Ulysses, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents fromAutolycus, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave himwelcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, andkissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolycusdesired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them.They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready anddivided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up intosmaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently andserved the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to thegoing down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full shareso that all were satisfied; but when the sun set and it came ondark, they went to bed and enjoyed the boon of sleep.

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  • 沈琬 08-02

      "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.

  • 周恩来 08-02

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."

  • 施魏因施泰格 08-02

       Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs,or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of thehouse, and behaving with all their old insolence. But when it wasnow time for dinner, and the flock of sheep and goats had come intothe town from all the country round, with their shepherds as usual,then Medon, who was their favourite servant, and who waited uponthem at table, said, "Now then, my young masters, you have hadenough sport, so come inside that we may get dinner ready. Dinner isnot a bad thing, at dinner time."

  • 林文琦 08-02

      "Hear me," he cried, "you god who visited me yesterday, and bademe sail the seas in search of my father who has so long beenmissing. I would obey you, but the Achaeans, and more particularly thewicked suitors, are hindering me that I cannot do so."

  • 张洪金 08-01

    {  "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.

  • 西摩尔 07-31

      As he was speaking a bird flew by upon his right hand- a hawk,Apollo's messenger. It held a dove in its talons, and the feathers, asit tore them off, fell to the ground midway between Telemachus and theship. On this Theoclymenus called him apart and caught him by thehand. "Telemachus," said he, "that bird did not fly on your right handwithout having been sent there by some god. As soon as I saw it I knewit was an omen; it means that you will remain powerful and thatthere will be no house in Ithaca more royal than your own."}

  • 高红霞 07-31

      "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."

  • 林玫瑰 07-31

      "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.

  • 徐晓亮 07-30

       "At any other time," replied Telemachus, "I should have bidden yougo to my own house, for you would find no want of hospitality; atthe present moment, however, you would not be comfortable there, for Ishall be away, and my mother will not see you; she does not often showherself even to the suitors, but sits at her loom weaving in anupper chamber, out of their way; but I can tell you a man whosehouse you can go to- I mean Eurymachus the son of Polybus, who is heldin the highest estimation by every one in Ithaca. He is much thebest man and the most persistent wooer, of all those who are payingcourt to my mother and trying to take Ulysses' place. Jove, however,in heaven alone knows whether or no they will come to a bad end beforethe marriage takes place."

  • 朴孝珍 07-28

    {  Then Antinous said, "What god can have sent such a pestilence toplague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court,or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolenceand importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they havegiven you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easyto be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."

  • 邢斌 07-28

      Pisistratus thought how he should do as he was asked, and in the endhe deemed it best to turn his horses towards the ship, and putMenelaus's beautiful presents of gold and raiment in the stern ofthe vessel. Then he said, "Go on board at once and tell your men to doso also before I can reach home to tell my father. I know howobstinate he is, and am sure he will not let you go; he will come downhere to fetch you, and he will not go back without you. But he will bevery angry."

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