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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:凯特-阿普顿 大小:gE9Amxyn70436KB 下载:N9UQgCsM93498次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:5BiCcJYg59551条
日期:2020-08-04 05:33:45
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'
2.  Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled andspeechless throughout the covered cloister. Then Arete said to them:
3.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."
4.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
5.  Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.
6.  "Then Jove let fly with his thunderbolts, and the ship went roundand round, and was filled with fire and brimstone as the lightningstruck it. The men all fell into the sea; they were carried about inthe water round the ship, looking like so many sea-gulls, but thegod presently deprived them of all chance of getting home again.

计划指导

1.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked thefleet horses to the chariot. The housekeeper packed them up aprovision of bread, wine, and sweetmeats fit for the sons ofprinces. Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratusgathered up the reins and took his seat beside him. He lashed thehorses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country,leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them. All that day did theytravel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down anddarkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae where Diocleslived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus. Here theypassed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn; appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and drove out through the gateway under the echoinggatehouse. Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forwardnothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands Of the opencountry, and in the course of time completed their journey, so welldid their steeds take them.
2.  Then the dear old nurse Euryclea said, "You may kill me, Madam, orlet me live on in your house, whichever you please, but I will tellyou the real truth. I knew all about it, and gave him everything hewanted in the way of bread and wine, but he made me take my solemnoath that I would not tell you anything for some ten or twelve days,unless you asked or happened to hear of his having gone, for he didnot want you to spoil your beauty by crying. And now, Madam, wash yourface, change your dress, and go upstairs with your maids to offerprayers to Minerva, daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, for she can savehim even though he be in the jaws of death. Do not trouble Laertes: hehas trouble enough already. Besides, I cannot think that the gods hatedie race of the race of the son of Arceisius so much, but there willbe a son left to come up after him, and inherit both the house and thefair fields that lie far all round it."
3.  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun westayed there eating and drinking our fill, but when the sun wentdown and it came on dark, we camped upon the sea shore. When the childof morning, fingered Dawn, appeared, I called a council and said,'My friends, we are in very great difficulties; listen therefore tome. We have no idea where the sun either sets or rises, so that wedo not even know East from West. I see no way out of it; nevertheless,we must try and find one. We are certainly on an island, for I went ashigh as I could this morning, and saw the sea reaching all round it tothe horizon; it lies low, but towards the middle I saw smoke risingfrom out of a thick forest of trees.'
4.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.
5.  THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."
6.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'

推荐功能

1.  When Alcinous heard this he took Ulysses by the hand, raised himfrom the hearth, and bade him take the seat of Laodamas, who hadbeen sitting beside him, and was his favourite son. A maid servantthen brought him water in a beautiful golden ewer and poured it into asilver basin for him to wash his hands, and she drew a clean tablebeside him; an upper servant brought him bread and offered him manygood things of what there was in the house, and Ulysses ate and drank.Then Alcinous said to one of the servants, "Pontonous, mix a cup ofwine and hand it round that we may make drink-offerings to Jove thelord of thunder, who is the protector of all well-disposedsuppliants."
2.TELL ME, O MUSE, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wideafter he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he wasacquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to savehis own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might hecould not save his men, for they perished through their own sheerfolly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the godprevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, too, about allthese things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you mayknow them.
3.  To this Penelope said, "As long, sir, as you will sit here andtalk to me, I can have no desire to go to bed. Still, people cannot dopermanently without sleep, and heaven has appointed us dwellers onearth a time for all things. I will therefore go upstairs andrecline upon that couch which I have never ceased to flood with mytears from the day Ulysses set out for the city with a hateful name."
4.  "'You will find the other rocks lie lower, but they are so closetogether that there is not more than a bowshot between them. [Alarge fig tree in full leaf grows upon it], and under it lies thesucking whirlpool of Charybdis. Three times in the day does shevomit forth her waters, and three times she sucks them down again; seethat you be not there when she is sucking, for if you are, Neptunehimself could not save you; you must hug the Scylla side and driveship by as fast as you can, for you had better lose six men thanyour whole crew.'
5.   Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."
6.  "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mindto; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, whomakes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to hisown good pleasure. This fellow means no harm by singing theill-fated return of the Danaans, for people always applaud thelatest songs most warmly. Make up your mind to it and bear it; Ulyssesis not the only man who never came back from Troy, but many anotherwent down as well as he. Go, then, within the house and busyyourself with your daily duties, your loom, your distaff, and theordering of your servants; for speech is man's matter, and mineabove all others- for it is I who am master here."

应用

1.  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.
2.  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.
3.  Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.
4、  "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."
5、  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

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网友评论(d9S0HK0t49899))

  • 李彦明 08-03

      "'I will do so gladly,' answered she, 'if you men will first swearme a solemn oath that you will do me no harm by the way.'

  • 蓝晶 08-03

      Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.

  • 杜牧 08-03

       Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."

  • 沙西 08-03

      Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."

  • 张昱欣 08-02

    {  Thus did they converse [and guests kept coming to the king'shouse. They brought sheep and wine, while their wives had put up breadfor them to take with them; so they were busy cooking their dinners inthe courts].

  • 乔布 08-01

      AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.}

  • 蒋昌建 08-01

      THENCE we went on to the Aeoli island where lives Aeolus son ofHippotas, dear to the immortal gods. It is an island that floats (asit were) upon the sea, iron bound with a wall that girds it. Now,Aeolus has six daughters and six lusty sons, so he made the sons marrythe daughters, and they all live with their dear father and mother,feasting and enjoying every conceivable kind of luxury. All day longthe atmosphere of the house is loaded with the savour of roastingmeats till it groans again, yard and all; but by night they sleep ontheir well-made bedsteads, each with his own wife between theblankets. These were the people among whom we had now come.

  • 蒋凯 08-01

      This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."

  • 尹小健 07-31

       Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."

  • 宋六一 07-29

    {  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

  • 利菁 07-29

      To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

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